Bridge Learning Campus

Trust in Learning. Trust in Success.

Get in touch

Contact Details

School Updates

Keep up-to-date with what's happening.

R
News View all news
R
Calendar Dates View all dates
R
Contact Us
A
B
Video Controls
Logo

Bridge

Learning Campus

Trust in Learning. Trust in Success.

Football

Top 10 Emirates FA Cup Goals by England Players

Football

 

Key Rules

Football is played with 11 players on each team – 10 outfield players, and 1 goalkeeper. The goalkeeper is the only player who can use their hands, as long as they are in the penalty area (see picture below).

The object of the game is to score by kicking or heading the ball into the opponent’s goal. The game is started from the middle of the centre circle and the ball can now be passed forwards or backwards.

 

Free-kicks are given when a rule is broken.

 

Direct free-kicks (where you can shoot straight at the goal) are given when players have been fouled – eg kicked, tripped, pushed, held, or when a player has deliberately handled the ball.

If any of these offences occur in the penalty area then a penalty-kick is awarded.

 

Indirect free-kicks (where the ball must be passed before you can shoot) are most commonly given for obstruction, off-side, and when a goalkeeper picks up a back-pass from a team-mate.

 

Handball – handball can be given by the referee if the ball makes contact with an outfield player on the hand or arm. However if the ball does hit a hand or arm it is not automatically handball.

The laws of the game state that “Handling the ball involves a deliberate act of a player making contact with the ball with the hand or arm.”

The laws also state that “The following must be considered: the movement of the hand towards the ball (not the ball towards the hand), and the distance between the opponent and the ball (unexpected ball).”

Put simply, this means that if someone has their arm in a natural position by the side of their body, and the ball is belted at them from a couple of metres away and hits their arm, according to the rules of the game it is not handball, no matter how much the players jump up and down and shout about it.

 

 

By now, we hope you know the basic rules of football, and why free-kicks are given, so we won’t repeat all that.

However, we will repeat handball, because so many people who play the game don’t actually know the rule properly –

 

Handball – handball can be given by the referee if the ball makes contact with an outfield player on the hand or arm. However if the ball does hit a hand or arm it is not automatically handball.

The laws of the game state that “Handling the ball involves a deliberate act of a player making contact with the ball with the hand or arm.”

The laws also state that “The following must be considered: the movement of the hand towards the ball (not the ball towards the hand), and the distance between the opponent and the ball (unexpected ball).”

Put simply, this means that if someone has their arm in a natural position by the side of their body, and the ball is belted at them from a couple of metres away and hits their arm, according to the rules of the game it is not handball, no matter how much the players jump up and down and shout about it.

 

We’d also like you to understand the law of offside.

A player is in an offside position if, when the ball is played by a team-mate, they are nearer to the opposition's goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent. So in the picture below, the player is in an offside position because there is only one opponent (the goalkeeper) between him and the goal. If there was also a defender between him and the goal then he wouldn’t be offside.

However, if you are in an off-side position, you are only actually penalised if you become ‘actively involved’ in the play. So if you kick the ball, block he goalkeeper’s view of the ball, or get in the way of a defender, you’d be given offside. However if you stand still and don’t get involved you shouldn’t be given as offside.

You also can't be offside if:

You receive the ball directly from a goal kick, a throw-in or a corner; if you are in your own half of the pitch; if you are level with the second last or last two opponents; or if you are level with or behind the team-mate who plays you the ball.

If you’re still confused after all that, then fair enough, because it is quite confusing. However, this should hopefully help you to understand it when we go through it on the pitch in lessons.

 

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41301000/gif/_41301013_offside_416.gif

 

 

We would also like you to learn more about positions and formations, so you can consider what position might best suit you.

Here are some of the main Positions you can play, and the attributes needed.

 

Goalkeeper – you need to be good with your hands, agile, and brave. It helps to be tall too, and these days there is also more emphasis on the goalkeeper being good on the ball.

 

Central defender – you need to be a strong tackler and good in the air at heading balls away. It helps to be a good communicator and to be good on the ball to help set up attacks too.

 

Full-back – again it is important to be a good tackler. Speed is a real asset as you are often up against quick players. It is helpful to be a good passer so you can pass out of defence and help set up attacks.

 

Wing-back – similar to a full-back, but you’d be asked to join in the attack more, so you need to be good at crossing, and you can’t play this position properly without being very fit.

 

Defensive midfielder – your main job is to protect your defenders by breaking up attacks, or filling in if defenders go forward. You should be a good tackler, a good short passer, and be able to read the game to get into the right position to stop the danger.

 

Central midfielder – you need plenty of energy to get up and down the pitch all game. You should be good on the ball, a good tackler, and be able to spot a pass and have the ability to play it. A decent long range shot is also a useful asset.

 

Wide midfielder / winger – these players are normally skillful and quick, with the ability to beat players, get crosses in, and shoot. You also need to be fit to do your defensive duties and get back as you are still a midfielder.

 

Striker/Forward – a centre-forward would usually be quick, with a good shot and strong in the air. They would also be able to control the ball well and hold it up, to bring other team-mates into play. Some strikers play just behind the main centre-forward and are usually more skillful and creative, as they link the midfield to the attack and are the main creator of chances for their team.

 

Formations – there are lots of different formations, but here are some of the most commonly used ones -

 

4-4-2 – a traditional formation of 4 defenders, 4 midfielders, and 2 strikers. The defence is made up of two centre-backs and two full-backs. Often of the two centre midfielders, one can

 

4-4-1-1 – is a similar formation, but has one main striker and a player who plays behind him ‘in the hole’, and can link the midfield and attack.

 

4-5-1 – again, a similar formation – but this time you play with one up front and have 5 midfielders. This is a more defensive formation as it packs the midfield, but can leave the striker isolated up front, so you need to  make sure some midfielders can get up to support the striker. 

 

3-5-2 – you have 3 centre-backs, and two wing-backs instead of full-backs. This can make you more solid defensively, but there is a lot of emphasis on your 2 wing-backs to get forward to be wide attackers, and also to get back to protect the wide areas on your defence.

 

Top